Tag Archive for: international service

Investigation Exposes Weaknesses in Vatican City’s Judicial System

 

A recent criminal investigation into a Vatican City real estate investment has revealed weaknesses in the Holy See’s judicial system, including a lack of protections for those accused. The result, it seems, is that the judicial system and procedures are incompatible with European norms.

 

Understanding Vatican City

 

Never a democracy, the Vatican instead has been a moral authority on a global scale and at the same time a monarch. The pope has the ultimate power — being the supreme legislator, executive, and judge — who can make laws and regulations (and waive them) as well as hire and fire officials, prosecutors, and judges. Marc Odendall, a former long-time papal advisor recently gave up his consulting roles in protest of the grave issues he saw coming out of the real estate probe because something had to be done.

 

The Investigation

 

The probe was into a 350 million-euro London real estate investment. The investigation came to light in October, 2019 when the pope’s security officials raided the offices of the central government of the Holy See — the Vatican secretariat of state. These body guards also raided the AIF, the Vatican’s financial watchdog authority. Notably, Pope Francis had personally authorized the raids in response to information that a trusted ally had alerted the Vatican’s prosecutors of questionable circumstances surrounding the investment. The Pope defended the raids on the AIF despite steep criticism.

 

While the investigation portrayed Pope Francis as a leader who was cracking down on corruption, there is evidence of financial mismanagement by Vatican officials, including agreeing to pay tens of millions of euros in fees to Italian middlemen. Suspects of the investigation claim Pope Francis was aware of the payment, even that he purportedly personally approved it, and that top Vatican leaders authorized the transaction.

 

Vatican Law

 

The case itself is highlighting the limitations embedded in Vatican law, which is based on Italian code from 1889. Not only is this code no longer in use in modern-day times, but compared to modern legal systems, it also diminishes the rights of defendants during an investigative phase of a case. One example of this is Pope Francis authorizing the Holy See’s prosecutors to us a “summary rite” during the investigation. This allows them to deviate from typical procedures and grants them discretion to interrogate and perform searches and seizures without any oversight from an investigating judge.

 

Complexity of International Law

 

The real estate investment investigation at Vatican City highlights how complicated international law can become. If you are pursuing a lawsuit against an international defendant, the last thing you want to be concerned with is proper service of process. The team at Ancillary Legal can handle all of your processing needs so you can focus on the substantive aspect of your case. Contact us today.

In our last post, we explained that the Convention on the Service Abroad of Judicial & Extrajudicial Documents in Civil or Commercial Matters (“Hague Service Convention”) is a multilateral treaty adopted on November 15, 1965 by member nations of the Hague Convention on Private International Law (the “Convention”). This Hague Service Convention created unified rules on several issues, including international service of process and has been ratified by 74 countries.

 

The Convention provides a streamlined way to effectuate international service of process through  each signatory nation’s Central Authority of each signatory nation. Until recently, it has been unclear as to whether service by mail is allowed and many plaintiff’s choose this method because it is faster than the methods provided under the Hague and other methods for non-signatory nations.

Unclear Position From Japan

 

The Japanese government did not object to service of process by mail at any point since signing the Hague Convention in 1970 until 2018. That being said, litigation with Japanese defendants did not clarify the issue until the United States Supreme Court (SCOTUS) issued a decision in Water Splash. In that case, a U.S. company sued a former employee in Texas state court. At the time of the lawsuit, the defendant was residing in Canada and was served by public mail, private mail, and email. The Texas state court entered a default judgment against the defendant for failure to respond. The former employee filed suit arguing lack of proper service and the parties argued whether the Hague Service convention allowed service of process by mail. The SCOTUS used the second interpretation of Article 10(a) and allowed service by mail.

 

Because the position of the Japanese government was not clear and courts could interpret that under the Hague service of process by mail is prohibited irrespective of whether a signatory objected to this method, using service by mail for Japanese defendants was a risk. Accordingly, many careful plaintiffs used service through the Japanese Central Authority (JCA) under the Hague Service Convention. Until the SCOTUS decision in Water Splash, the Japanese government had halted direct service of process by mail.

 

Bottom Line

 

After the SCOTUS decision in Walter Splash, it was more likely that service of process made directly to defendants located in Japan by mail would be permitted. Japan’s declaration, however, has annulled this alternative method of service. As a result, in contemplating future lawsuits against Japanese defendants, the parties to a deal may enter into negotiations where service under the Hague Service Convention is avoided by a potential plaintiff and in exchange the Japanese-stationed party can get favorable concessions in exchange for voluntarily accepting service of process. Indeed, an American party may request a Japanese counterpart to designate a United States agent for service of process in the event of a lawsuit in contract negotiations. Of course, the Japanese party should analyze the implications of agreeing to this.

 

More on this topic can be found here.

For info on service in Japan please go here. 

Attorneys and paralegals frequently ask “Is Argentina a member of the Hague Convention?” The short answer is yes. However, the question is a bit more complicated than a simple yes.

The “Hague Convention” is a term that is used interchangeably for several different treaties that many countries are parties to. Overall, there are 42 “Hague Conventions”. The most commonly referred to treaty is the Service Treaty. The full name is The Convention of 15 November 1965 on the Service Abroad of Judicial and Extrajudicial Documents in Civil or Commercial Matters. So when asking about the Service Convention, yes, Argentina is a member.

This means that process service in Argentina must conform to the protocols and requirements of the Convention. This is mandated by international law and the Supreme Court of the United States. However, Argentina has gone one step further and declares that the only valid service is service through Article 5 of the Convention. Thus, Argentina’s central authority is the only recognized agency for service. Even further, Argentina has special requirements for their pleadings and transmittal of the service documents. Failure to comply with Argentina’s requirements means you will lose time and money.

When you have a service request for Argentina, make sure to hire someone that knows Argentina’s rules but also guarantees their translations. Argentina routinely sends documents back to attorneys for improper translations. Ancillary Legal knows how to avoid this problem.

Ancillary has decades of experience serving process in Argentina . We have relationships with their agents and know exactly what they need for service. Ancillary guarantees its translations and submissions to Argentina for accuracy to Argentina’s specific requirements. We are happy to help you serve documents in Argentina, with competitive prices, attorney reviewed documents, and decades of knowledge to make sure your request is not returned for improper submission.

Attorneys and paralegals frequently ask “Is Vietnam a member of the Hague Convention?” The short answer is yes. However, the question is a bit more complicated than a simple yes.

The “Hague Convention” is a term that is used interchangeably for several different treaties that many countries are parties to. Overall, there are 42 “Hague Conventions”. The most commonly referred to treaty is the Service Treaty. The full name is The Convention of 15 November 1965 on the Service Abroad of Judicial and Extrajudicial Documents in Civil or Commercial Matters. So when asking about the Service Convention, yes, Vietnam is a member.

This means that process service in Vietnam must conform to the protocols and requirements of the Convention. This is mandated by international law and the Supreme Court of the United States. However, Vietnam has gone one step further and declares that the only valid service is service through Article 5 of the Convention. Thus, Vietnam’s central authority is the only recognized agency for service. Even further, Vietnam has special requirements for their pleadings and transmittal of the service documents. Failure to comply with Vietnam’s requirements means you will lose time and money.

When you have a service request for Vietnam, make sure to hire someone that knows Vietnam’s rules but also guarantees their translations. Vietnam routinely sends documents back to attorneys for improper translations. Ancillary Legal knows how to avoid this problem.

Ancillary has decades of experience serving process in Vietnam . We have relationships with their agents and know exactly what they need for service. Ancillary guarantees its translations and submissions to Vietnam for accuracy to Vietnam’s specific requirements. We are happy to help you serve documents in Vietnam, with competitive prices, attorney reviewed documents, and decades of knowledge to make sure your request is not returned for improper submission.

Attorneys and paralegals frequently ask “Is Sweden a member of the Hague Convention?” The short answer is yes. However, the question is a bit more complicated than a simple yes.

The “Hague Convention” is a term that is used interchangeably for several different treaties that many countries are parties to. Overall, there are 42 “Hague Conventions”. The most commonly referred to treaty is the Service Treaty. The full name is The Convention of 15 November 1965 on the Service Abroad of Judicial and Extrajudicial Documents in Civil or Commercial Matters. So when asking about the Service Convention, yes, Sweden is a member.

This means that process service in Sweden must conform to the protocols and requirements of the Convention. This is mandated by international law and the Supreme Court of the United States. However, Sweden has gone one step further and declares that the only valid service is service through Article 5 of the Convention. Thus, Sweden’s central authority is the only recognized agency for service. Even further, Sweden has special requirements for their pleadings and transmittal of the service documents. Failure to comply with Sweden’s requirements means you will lose time and money.

When you have a service request for Sweden, make sure to hire someone that knows Sweden’s rules but also guarantees their translations. Sweden routinely sends documents back to attorneys for improper translations. Ancillary Legal knows how to avoid this problem.

Ancillary has decades of experience serving process in Sweden . We have relationships with their agents and know exactly what they need for service. Ancillary guarantees its translations and submissions to Sweden for accuracy to Sweden’s specific requirements. We are happy to help you serve documents in Sweden, with competitive prices, attorney reviewed documents, and decades of knowledge to make sure your request is not returned for improper submission.

Attorneys and paralegals frequently ask “Is Switzerland a member of the Hague Convention?” The short answer is yes. However, the question is a bit more complicated than a simple yes.

The “Hague Convention” is a term that is used interchangeably for several different treaties that many countries are parties to. Overall, there are 42 “Hague Conventions”. The most commonly referred to treaty is the Service Treaty. The full name is The Convention of 15 November 1965 on the Service Abroad of Judicial and Extrajudicial Documents in Civil or Commercial Matters. So when asking about the Service Convention, yes, Switzerland is a member.

This means that process service in Switzerland must conform to the protocols and requirements of the Convention. This is mandated by international law and the Supreme Court of the United States. However, Switzerland has gone one step further and declares that the only valid service is service through Article 5 of the Convention. Thus, Switzerland’s central authority is the only recognized agency for service. Even further, Switzerland has special requirements for their pleadings and transmittal of the service documents. Failure to comply with Switzerland’s requirements means you will lose time and money.

When you have a service request for Switzerland, make sure to hire someone that knows Switzerland’s rules but also guarantees their translations. Switzerland routinely sends documents back to attorneys for improper translations. Ancillary Legal knows how to avoid this problem.

Ancillary has decades of experience serving process in Switzerland . We have relationships with their agents and know exactly what they need for service. Ancillary guarantees its translations and submissions to Switzerland for accuracy to Switzerland’s specific requirements. We are happy to help you serve documents in Switzerland, with competitive prices, attorney reviewed documents, and decades of knowledge to make sure your request is not returned for improper submission.

Attorneys and paralegals frequently ask “Is Turkey a member of the Hague Convention?” The short answer is yes. However, the question is a bit more complicated than a simple yes.

The “Hague Convention” is a term that is used interchangeably for several different treaties that many countries are parties to. Overall, there are 42 “Hague Conventions”. The most commonly referred to treaty is the Service Treaty. The full name is The Convention of 15 November 1965 on the Service Abroad of Judicial and Extrajudicial Documents in Civil or Commercial Matters. So when asking about the Service Convention, yes, Turkey is a member.

This means that process service in Turkey must conform to the protocols and requirements of the Convention. This is mandated by international law and the Supreme Court of the United States. However, Turkey has gone one step further and declares that the only valid service is service through Article 5 of the Convention. Thus, Turkey’s central authority is the only recognized agency for service. Even further, Turkey has special requirements for their pleadings and transmittal of the service documents. Failure to comply with Turkey’s requirements means you will lose time and money.

When you have a service request for Turkey, make sure to hire someone that knows Turkey’s rules but also guarantees their translations. Turkey routinely sends documents back to attorneys for improper translations. Ancillary Legal knows how to avoid this problem.

Ancillary has decades of experience serving process in Turkey . We have relationships with their agents and know exactly what they need for service. Ancillary guarantees its translations and submissions to Turkey for accuracy to Turkey’s specific requirements. We are happy to help you serve documents in Turkey, with competitive prices, attorney reviewed documents, and decades of knowledge to make sure your request is not returned for improper submission.

Attorneys and paralegals frequently ask “Is the United Kingdom a member of the Hague Convention?” The short answer is yes. However, the question is a bit more complicated than a simple yes.

The “Hague Convention” is a term that is used interchangeably for several different treaties that many countries are parties to. Overall, there are 42 “Hague Conventions”. The most commonly referred to treaty is the Service Treaty. The full name is The Convention of 15 November 1965 on the Service Abroad of Judicial and Extrajudicial Documents in Civil or Commercial Matters. So when asking about the Service Convention, yes, the United Kingdom is a member.

This means that process service in the United Kingdom must conform to the protocols and requirements of the Convention. This is mandated by international law and the Supreme Court of the United States. However, the United Kingdom has gone one step further and declares that the only valid service is service through Article 5 of the Convention. Thus, the United Kingdom’s central authority is the only recognized agency for service. Even further, the United Kingdom has special requirements for their pleadings and transmittal of the service documents. Failure to comply with the United Kingdom’s requirements means you will lose time and money.

Ancillary has decades of experience serving process in the United Kingdom . We have relationships with their agents and know exactly what they need for service. Ancillary guarantees its submissions to the United Kingdom for accuracy to the United Kingdom’s specific requirements. We are happy to help you serve documents in the United Kingdom, with competitive prices, attorney reviewed documents, and decades of knowledge to make sure your request is not returned for improper submission.

Attorneys and paralegals frequently ask “Is France a member of the Hague Convention?” The short answer is yes. However, the question is a bit more complicated than a simple yes.

The “Hague Convention” is a term that is used interchangeably for several different treaties that many countries are parties to. Overall, there are 42 “Hague Conventions”. The most commonly referred to treaty is the Service Treaty. The full name is The Convention of 15 November 1965 on the Service Abroad of Judicial and Extrajudicial Documents in Civil or Commercial Matters. So when asking about the Service Convention, yes, France is a member.

This means that process service in France must conform to the protocols and requirements of the Convention. This is mandated by international law and the Supreme Court of the United States. However, France has gone one step further and declares that the only valid service is service through Article 5 of the Convention. Thus, France’s central authority is the only recognized agency for service. Even further, France has special requirements for their pleadings and transmittal of the service documents. Failure to comply with France’s requirements means you will lose time and money.

When you have a service request for France, make sure to hire someone that knows France’s rules but also guarantees their translations. France routinely sends documents back to attorneys for improper translations. Ancillary Legal knows how to avoid this problem.

Ancillary has decades of experience serving process in France . We have relationships with their agents and know exactly what they need for service. Ancillary guarantees its translations and submissions to France for accuracy to France’s specific requirements. We are happy to help you serve documents in France, with competitive prices, attorney reviewed documents, and decades of knowledge to make sure your request is not returned for improper submission.

Attorneys and paralegals frequently ask “Is Spain a member of the Hague Convention?” The short answer is yes. However, the question is a bit more complicated than a simple yes.

The “Hague Convention” is a term that is used interchangeably for several different treaties that many countries are parties to. Overall, there are 42 “Hague Conventions”. The most commonly referred to treaty is the Service Treaty. The full name is The Convention of 15 November 1965 on the Service Abroad of Judicial and Extrajudicial Documents in Civil or Commercial Matters. So when asking about the Service Convention, yes, Spain is a member.

This means that process service in Spain must conform to the protocols and requirements of the Convention. This is mandated by international law and the Supreme Court of the United States. However, Spain has gone one step further and declares that the only valid service is service through Article 5 of the Convention. Thus, Spain’s central authority is the only recognized agency for service. Even further, Spain has special requirements for their pleadings and transmittal of the service documents. Failure to comply with Spain’s requirements means you will lose time and money.

When you have a service request for Spain, make sure to hire someone that knows Spain’s rules but also guarantees their translations. Spain routinely sends documents back to attorneys for improper translations. Ancillary Legal knows how to avoid this problem.

Ancillary has decades of experience serving process in Spain . We have relationships with their agents and know exactly what they need for service. Ancillary guarantees its translations and submissions to Spain for accuracy to Spain’s specific requirements. We are happy to help you serve documents in Spain, with competitive prices, attorney reviewed documents, and decades of knowledge to make sure your request is not returned for improper submission.

Attorneys and paralegals frequently ask “Is South Korea a member of the Hague Convention?” The short answer is yes. However, the question is a bit more complicated than a simple yes.

The “Hague Convention” is a term that is used interchangeably for several different treaties that many countries are parties to. Overall, there are 42 “Hague Conventions”. The most commonly referred to treaty is the Service Treaty. The full name is The Convention of 15 November 1965 on the Service Abroad of Judicial and Extrajudicial Documents in Civil or Commercial Matters. So when asking about the Service Convention, yes, South Korea is a member.

This means that process service in South Korea must conform to the protocols and requirements of the Convention. This is mandated by international law and the Supreme Court of the United States. However, South Korea has gone one step further and declares that the only valid service is service through Article 5 of the Convention. Thus, South Korea’s central authority is the only recognized agency for service. Even further, South Korea has special requirements for their pleadings and transmittal of the service documents. Failure to comply with South Korea’s requirements means you will lose time and money.

When you have a service request for South Korea, make sure to hire someone that knows South Korea’s rules but also guarantees their translations. South Korea routinely sends documents back to attorneys for improper translations. Ancillary Legal knows how to avoid this problem.

Ancillary has decades of experience serving process in South Korea . We have relationships with their agents and know exactly what they need for service. Ancillary guarantees its translations and submissions to South Korea for accuracy to South Korea’s specific requirements. We are happy to help you serve documents in South Korea, with competitive prices, attorney reviewed documents, and decades of knowledge to make sure your request is not returned for improper submission.

Attorneys and paralegals frequently ask “Is Japan a member of the Hague Convention?” The short answer is yes. However, the question is a bit more complicated than a simple yes.

The “Hague Convention” is a term that is used interchangeably for several different treaties that many countries are parties to. Overall, there are 42 “Hague Conventions”. The most commonly referred to treaty is the Service Treaty. The full name is The Convention of 15 November 1965 on the Service Abroad of Judicial and Extrajudicial Documents in Civil or Commercial Matters. So when asking about the Service Convention, yes, Japan is a member.

This means that process service in Japan must conform to the protocols and requirements of the Convention. This is mandated by international law and the Supreme Court of the United States. However, Japan has gone one step further and declares that the only valid service is service through Article 5 of the Convention. Thus, Japan’s central authority is the only recognized agency for service. Even further, Japan has special requirements for their pleadings and transmittal of the service documents. Failure to comply with Japan’s requirements means you will lose time and money.

When you have a service request for Japan, make sure to hire someone that knows Japan’s rules but also guarantees their translations. Japan routinely sends documents back to attorneys for improper translations. Ancillary Legal knows how to avoid this problem.

Ancillary has decades of experience serving process in Japan . We have relationships with their agents and know exactly what they need for service. Ancillary guarantees its translations and submissions to Japan for accuracy to Japan’s specific requirements. We are happy to help you serve documents in Japan, with competitive prices, attorney reviewed documents, and decades of knowledge to make sure your request is not returned for improper submission.